Associate's Degree and University Transfer - Associate of Science

The Associate of Science degree (AS-T) is designed for students who plan to transfer to science programs at four-year institutions after completing the first two years of study at Pierce. The degree enables students to fulfill the undergraduate general education requirements of most four-year science degree programs. Students are responsible for checking specific major requirements of baccalaureate institutions in the year prior to transferring.

There are two degree track options:

Associate of Science (AS) Degree Track #1

For Science Pre-Majors in Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Environmental/Resource Sciences, Geology and Earth Science

General Degree Requirements

  1. Minimum of 90 earned credits in courses numbered 100 or above is required to complete the AS-T degree.
  2. Minimum of 25 of last 45 credits must be earned at Pierce.
  3. Cumulative college-level grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or higher is required.
  4. 1.5 grade (C-) or higher is required for all coursework unless prerequisites state otherwise. Coursework with a grade of 0.7 through 1.4 (D's) may be used for general elective credit only.
  5. Pass (P) grades may be used only for General Elective credits.
  6. Independent Study may be used only for General Elective credits.
  7. Once a course has been successfully completed, credits earned may be used only once, even if that course is listed in more than one category.

Note: Additional general education, cultural diversity and foreign language requirements, as required by the transfer institution, must be met prior to the completion of a baccalaureate degree.

Course Requirements (90-93 total credits required)

GENERAL REQUIRED COURSES (30 credits)

Communication Skills (5 credits)

  ENGL& 101 English Composition I (required) ( 5 credits)
Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning Skills (10 credits) Two courses required at or above introductory calculus level.

 

MATH& 151  Calculus I (5 credits)
MATH& 152 Calculus II (5 credits)

Humanities and Social Sciences (15 credits) Maximum of five credits under the performance/skills area may be used. See AA-DTA distribution list
 

Humanities (5 credits minimum)
Social Science(5 credits minimum)
Humanities or Social Science (5 credits minimum)

SCIENCE PRE-MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (35-38 credits)
 

CHEM& 161-163 General Chemistry w/lab I-III (15 credits)
MATH& 146 Statistics;(5 credits)
OR
MATH& 135 Calculus III (5 credits)

Biology OR Physics sequence*. (15-18 credits)
Students should check with the receiving institution to determine which sequence is appropriate. Some baccalaureate institutions require physics with calculus. *ICRC guidelines: sequences should not be broken up between institutions (e.g., the typical three-quarter physics sequence should be taken entirely at one institution).

BIOL& 211-213 Majors: Cellular/Animal/Plant
OR
PHYS& 121-123 General Physics I-III 
OR
PHYS& 221-223; Engineering Physics I-III

Additional Science Requirements (10-18 credits)
Courses chosen in physics, geology, organic chemistry, biology or mathematics consisting of courses normally taken for science majors (not for general education), preferably in a two- or three-quarter sequence, chosen with the help of an advisor. Note: Biology majors should select organic chemistry or physics for this requirement.

List of appropriate courses:

 

BIOL& 241 Human Anatomy & Physiology 1
BIOL& 242 Human Anatomy & Physiology 2
BIOL& 211-213 Majors: Cellular/Animal/Plant
CHEM& 261-263 Organic Chemistry w/lab I-III
GEOL& 101 Intro Physical Geology
GEOL& 103 Historical Geology
GEOL& 110 Environmental Geology
GEOL 220 Earth Resources & the Environment

MATH& 146 Introduction to Statistics
MATH& 153 Calculus III
MATH 205 Linear Algebra
MATH 224 Multivariate Calculus
MATH 238 Differential Equations
PHYS& 121-123 General Physics I-III
OR
PHYS& 221-223 Engineering Physics I-III

General Electives (15 credits)
 

College level courses numbered 100 and above. Remaining credits may include prerequisites for pre-major courses (e.g., pre-calculus), meet additional pre-major coursework, or satisfy specific general education or other university requirements. A maximum of five PE activity credits can be applied to this degree

 

Associate of Science (AS) Degree Track #1 Outcomes

Program Outcomes

Degree Outcomes:
General Education at Pierce College prepares graduates to live and work in a dynamically changing world by emphasizing whole student development through fundamental areas of knowledge and the college five core abilities.

Core Abilities Outcomes

Critical, Creative, and Reflective Thinking:
Graduates will evaluate, analyze, and synthesize information and ideas in order to construct informed, meaningful, and justifiable conclusions.

Responsibility:
Graduates will be able to critically examine the relationship between self, community, and/or environments, and to evaluate and articulate potential impacts and consequences of choices, actions, and contributions for the creation of sustainable systems.

Information Competency:
Graduates will be able to seek, find, evaluate and use information and employ information technology to engage in lifelong learning.

Effective Communication:
Graduates will be able to exchange messages in a variety of contexts using multiple methods.

Multiculturalism:
Graduates will demonstrate knowledge of diverse ideas, cultures, and experiences, and develop the ability to examine their own attitudes and assumptions in order to understand and work with others who differ from themselves.

Fundamental Areas of Knowledge Outcomes

Communication:
Graduates identify, analyze, and evaluate rhetorical strategies in one's own and other's writing in order to communicate effectively.

Humanities:
Graduates acquire skills to critically interpret, analyze and evaluate forms of human expression, and create and perform as an expression of the human experience.

Social Sciences:
Graduates use social science research methods and/or theory in order to analyze and interpret social phenomena.

Natural Sciences:
Graduates use the scientific method to analyze natural phenomena and acquire skills to evaluate authenticity of data/information relative to the natural world.

Quantitative & Symbolic Reasoning:
Graduates utilize mathematical, symbolic, logical, graphical, geometric, or statistical analysis for the interpretation and solution of problems in the natural world and human society.

Associate of Science (AS) Degree Track #2

For Science Pre-Majors in Engineering, Computer Science, Physics and Atmospheric Sciences

Course Requirements (93 total credits required)

GENERAL REQUIRED COURSES (30 credits)

Communication Skills (5 credits)

  ENGL& 101 English Composition I (required) ( 5 credits)
Quantitative/Symbolic Reasoning Skills (10 credits) Two courses required at or above introductory calculus level.

 

MATH& 151  Calculus I (5 credits)
MATH& 152 Calculus II (5 credits)

Humanities and Social Sciences (15 credits) Maximum of five credits under the performance/skills area may be used. See AA-DTA distribution list
 

Humanities (5 credits minimum)
Social Science(5 credits minimum)
Humanities or Social Science (5 credits minimum)

SCIENCE PRE-MAJOR REQUIREMENTS (28 credits)
 

CHEM& 161 General Chemistry w/lab I (5 credits)
MATH& 146 Intro to Statistics (5 credits)
OR
MATH& 153 Calculus III (5 credits)

Physics sequence: (18 credits)
*PHYS& 221 Engineering Physics I
*PHYS& 222 Engineering Physics II
*PHYS& 223 Engineering Physics III


*ICRC Guidelines: Sequences should not be broken up between institutions (e.g., the typical three-quarter physics sequence should be taken entirely at one institution).

Additional Science Requirements (20 credits) Courses must be selected from the list of courses below.
Note: A two or three-quarter sequence is recommended to be chosen with the help of an advisor.

List of appropriate courses:

 

CHEM& 162/163 General Chemistry w/lab II/III
CS& 131 Computer Science I-C++
CS& 141 Computer Science I-Java
CS 202 Computer Science II
ENGR &114 Engineering Graphics
ENGR 142 Computer Programming C++ for Engineers
ENGR& 214 Statics
ENGR& 215 Dynamics
ENGR& 225 Mechanics of Materials
ENGR& 224 Thermodynamics
MATH& 146 Introduction to Statistics
MATH 205 Linear Algebra
MATH 224 Multivariate Calculus
MATH 238 Differential Equations

General Electives (15 credits)
 

Minimum of 10 credits that satisfy Pierce’s AA-DTA Core requirements, i.e., GER-NS, GER-HM, GER-SS, GER-CM or GER-QS. See Associate of Arts (AA-DTA) section for specific classes. Maximum of five credits of any college-level course numbered 100 or higher. Physical education activity credits may be used only in this area.

Associate of Science (AS) Degree Track #2 Outcomes

Program Outcomes

Degree Outcomes:
General Education at Pierce College prepares graduates to live and work in a dynamically changing world by emphasizing whole student development through fundamental areas of knowledge and the college five core abilities.

Core Abilities Outcomes

Critical, Creative, and Reflective Thinking:
Graduates will be able to question, search for answers and meaning, and develop ideas that lead to action.

Responsibility:
Graduates will be able to respond by examining the relationship between self, community, and environments, evaluating potential impacts and consequences of actions, and making choices and contributions based on that examination and evaluation.

Information Competency:
Graduates will be able to seek, find, evaluate and use information and employ information technology to engage in lifelong learning.

Effective Communication:
Graduates will be able to exchange messages in a variety of contexts using multiple methods.

Multiculturalism:
Graduates will demonstrate knowledge of diverse ideas, cultures and experiences and the ability to examine their own attitudes and assumptions in order to engage others with civility and empathy.

Fundamental Areas of Knowledge Outcomes

Communication:
Graduates identify, analyze, and evaluate rhetorical strategies in one's own and other's writing in order to communicate effectively.

Humanities:
Graduates acquire skills to critically interpret, analyze and evaluate forms of human expression, and create and perform as an expression of the human experience.

Social Sciences:
Graduates use social science research methods and/or theory in order to analyze and interpret social phenomena.

Natural Sciences:
Graduates use the scientific method to analyze natural phenomena and acquire skills to evaluate authenticity of data/information relative to the natural world.

Quantitative & Symbolic Reasoning:
Graduates utilize mathematical, symbolic, logical, graphical, geometric, or statistical analysis for the interpretation and solution of problems in the natural world and human society.

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